Guinea Hog Pigs
Home | Press Room | Join Email List | Advertise | About Us | Contact Us | Sign InLivestock Of the World
Livestock
Breeds Of
Livestock Home
Alpacas
Alpacas
Bison
Bison
Cattle
Cattle
Chickens
Chickens
Dogs
Dogs
Donkeys
Donkey
Emus
Emus
Goats
Goats
Horses
Horses
Llamas
Llamas
Pigs
Pigs
Rabbits
Rabbits
Emus
Sheep
Turkeys
Turkeys
Yaks
Yaks
Yaks For Sale
Pigs
Pigs
   About Pigs
Pigs for Sale At
   Livestock Of America
   Livestock Of Canada




Sponsors


Ranch Website

About Guinea Hog PigsAbout Guinea Hog Pigs

Photo by Jack Rowland
Photo by Jack Rowland
Guinea Hogs, also known as Pineywoods Guinea, Guinea Forest Hog, Acorn Eater, and Yard Pigs, are unique to the United States. Despite their name, Guinea Hogs are not from the country of Guinea. The Guinea Hog has a black coat, sturdy body, curly tail and upright ears.

Guinea hogs are very easy hogs to keep. They are good as free-range foragers but they are also at home in a farmyard. No vaccinations, worming rarely needed no vet bills unless a hog is physically injured. If farrowing is planned in the spring or summer, just a dry covered nesting place is needed. No heat, etc. is needed. They are easy to contain with a high tensile electric fence (you will need a low wire at 6 inches, 18 inches, and 30 inches). They are even handy to have around because they eat snakes.

If they are habituated to people as piglets, they become dog like and actively seek out people for a scratch and tummy rub. They lay down at your feet and go to sleep.

They do fine on just pasture and hay, but some ranchers supplement their feed with sprouted grains. These are lard pigs so you should go very light on commercial feed, except when lactating or they will go to fat. A fat hog will have trouble breeding. Sows need to be bred their 1st year or they will lose their fertility. 

Guinea hogs are small pigs compared to modern breeds; they weigh less than 200 pounds and will yield 50 to 100 pounds of meat and fat. 

Guinea Hogs fell out of favor after 1880 and for a while they were in danger of being entirely lost. In 2005 the American Guinea Hog Association was formed which now ensures its continued existence. The Guinea Hog is also included in Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste, a catalog of heritage foods in danger of extinction. They are now on a comeback - there where around about 1200 hogs as of 2014.


Guinea Hog Pigs Associations


The American Guinea Hog Association The American Guinea Hog Association - www.guineahogs.org


Pigs for Sale

View Pigs for Sale At

www.livestockofamerica.com/Pigs/


www.livestockofCanada.com/Pigs/
Livestock Of The World