Norman Cob Horses
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About Norman Cob HorsesAbout Norman Cob Horses



Norman Cobs are descended from bidets, small horses that from Asia. They were brought by the Celts. They lived in Brittany and Normandy before the start of the Roman Empire. Eventually these horses reached Russia and were interbred to Mongolian Horses. Romans interbred these horses with their heavy pack mares. In the 10th century the Norman breeders were known for their war horses--large, strong with good endurance. In the 16th and 17th centuries Barb and Arabian blood was introduced. In 1665 the first royal stud farms were founded. Stallions were selected in 1730. In the 19th century the Norfolk Roadster was mixed in. English Thoroughbred blood was added along with English hunter stallions. The horse developed into the Anglo-Norman (in France called the Normand Cob) and recently Selle Francais horses.  

Even though Norman Cob stallions are to be found at the National studs, especially at Saint Lo, no studbook is kept, although breeding is documented and in some areas performance testing of young stock is carried out.  

Norman Cobs range from 15.3 hh to 16.3 hh. They are a light draft horse with a forward moving trot. The trot is the working gait. They have freedom of movement with a high set tail. Their build is strong and stocky. They are energetic, docile, lively, and of excellent temperament. Their neck is crested and their head is heavy. Their coupling is short, have powerful hindquarters, proportionate hocks, sort cannons and shanks, with prominent joints. Their barrel is round and deep. They have strong shoulders with a good slope, and a strong back. Their hooves are medium sized, hard, and sound. Their legs are short, extremely muscular, lightly feathered at the heel, with good bone. They are found in chestnut bay or bay and brown. Gray and red roan are rare but do exist.

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