Carthusian Horses
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Carthusian (also known as Carthusian-Andalusian, andrnCarthujano) horses originated in Spain. They were created when the Zamorarnbrothers purchased a stallion by the name of El Soldado and bred him to twornmares. A colt and a filly were produced, and the colt (a dark gray) was namedrnEsclavo and went on to become the foundation sire of the Carthusian breed.rnEsclavo went on to produce many offspring, which were sold to breeders in Jerez,rnSpain. One group of mares sired by Esclavo around 1736 were sold to Don PedrornPicado, who then gave part of them to a group of Carthusian monks in thernsettlement of a debt and sold the rest to Antonio Abad Romero where they werernabsorbed into the main Andalusian breed. The stock given to the monks were bredrninto a special line, known as Zamoranos, and specific breeding of thernCarthusian horse was established by the 1400s.

rnrnThroughout the following centuries, the Zamoranos bloodlinesrnwere guarded by the Carthusian monks, to the point of defying royal orders tornintroduce outside blood from the Neapolitan horse and central European breeds. Theyrndid, however, introduce Arabian and Barb blood to improve the strain. By thern1700s and 1800s the Carthusian strain was beginning to become well established.rnThe Carthusian monks sold a large number of horses to Don Pedro and Juan JosernZapata, which were subsequently purchased in 1854 by Don Vincent Romero yrnGarcia, a Jerez landholder. Through his breeding expertise, Don Vincentrnimproved the breed quality without introducing outside blood. Today, thernCarthusian strain is raised in state-owned studs around Jerez de la Frontera,rnBadajoz, and Cordoba.

rnrnThe stallion Esclavo is said to have had warts under hisrntail, and his characteristics were passed on to his offspring. Some breedersrnfelt that without the warts, a horse could not be of the Esclavo blood line.rnAnother characteristic sometimes seen in the Carthusian is the evidence ofrn"horns," actually frontal bosses thought to be inherited from Asianrnancestors. The descriptions of the "horns" vary from calcium-likerndeposits on the temple to small horns behind or near the ear. Unlike the wartsrnbeneath the tail, the horns were not considered proof of Esclavo descent.

rnrnThey are used for riding and are 15.2 hh. Carthusian horsesrnare not a separate breed from the Andalusians, but are a distinct side branchrnof that breed and usually considered the purest strain remaining. They are onernof Spain's most prestigious lines and have one of the oldest stud books in thernworld.

rnrnTheir predominant color is gray. Some Carthusians arernchestnut or black. Their head is light and elegant with a slightly convexrnprofile, broad forehead, small ears, and large, lively eyes. Their neck is wellrnproportioned and arched; their chest is broad and deep; their shoulders slop;rntheir back short and broad; their croup is sloped; and the legs are sturdy withrnbroad, clean joints. Nearly all members of this breed have good conformation.

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