Georgian Grande Horses
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About Georgian Grande HorsesAbout Georgian Grande Horses

Photo: Grande Isle Farm


Georgian Grande horses are crossbreeds bewteen Friesian and Saddlebred horses. The aim of the breeding is to create a Saddlebred-like horse that adds the best qualities of heavier breeds. They are intelligent, alert, proud but always calm and quiet. They are also easy to train and very willing to work.

The first attempts to create a new, heavier Saddlebred-type breed were made in the 1970s by George Wagner Jr, in Piketon, Ohio. His ambition was to recreate the stockier, sturdier look of the Saddlebred of older times, such as the animals used as cavalry mounts during the American Civil War. He considered this the original type of the Saddlebred horse instead of the prevailing modern, lighter type. Wagner's breeding succeeded in creating horses of the desired type, and the breed was named after him as "George's great horse". The breed association International Georgian Grande Horse Registry was founded in 1994, and was later accepted as a member under the United States Dressage Federation All Breeds Council and the American Horse Council.

The height of the Georgian Grande Horse ranges from 15.2 to 17 hands (62 to 68 inches, 157 to 173 cm) or higher at withers, and the weight from 1,000 to 1,400 pounds (450 to 640 kg). All colors of coat and eyes are accepted. The desired overall impression is a horse that is tall, strong-boned and of striking appearance. The desired character of a Georgian Grande Horse is alert and intelligent but calm. The horse should be easy to train and very cooperative. A Georgian Grande Horse is not considered mature until the age of six years.  

Their forehead is broad and their eyes large and set wide apart. Their profile should be straight or slightly concave, with a delicate muzzle and large nostrils. Their ears should have a good shape and express the desired alert character of the horse. Their neck is long, arched and well-muscled, flowing into well-defined withers, and a back that is level and relatively short. Their shoulders are deep and sloping to allow for good movement. Their croup should be slightly sloping rather than level. Their hips should be wide and round. Their legs are properly angled and well-set, and their conformation should allow them to be good at jumping. Their joints should be large, flat, and clean. Their legs are desired to be thick with good bone; the circumference of the cannon of a mature horse, measured just below the knee, should be 9 inches (23 cm) at the minimum, and a larger circumference is desirable. The hooves should be large and in proportion to the size of the horse.

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