Angora Goats
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About Angora GoatsAbout Angora Goats

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The Angora goat is a breed of domestic goat named for Ankara,Turkey, historically known as Angora. Angora goats produce mohair fiber.

The Angora goat has been regarded by some as a direct descendant of the Central Asian Markhor goat. They were found in central Asia since around the Paleolithic era. In the 1550's the first Angora goats were brought to Europe by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and they were first introduced in the United States in 1849 by Dr. James P. Davis. Seven adult goats were a gift from Sultan Abdulmecid in appreciation for his services and advice on the raising of cotton. More goats were imported over time, until the Civil War destroyed most of the large flocks in the south. Eventually, Angora goats began to thrive in the southwest, particularly in Texas, wherever there are sufficient grasses and shrubs to sustain them. Texas to this day remains the largest mohair producer in the U.S., and third largest in the world!

The fleece taken from an Angora goat is called Mohair. A single goat produces between four and five kilograms of hair per year. Angoras are shorn twice a year. Turkey, the United States, and South Africaare the top producers of mohair. For a long time, Angora goats were bred for their white coats. In 1998, the Colored Angora Goat Breeders Association was set up to promote breeding of colored Angoras. Now, Angora goats produce white, black (deep black to greys and silver), red (the color fades significantly as the goat gets older), and brownish fibers.

They are not prolific breeders, nor are they considered very hardy, being particularly delicate during the first few days of life. Further, Angoras have high nutritional requirements due to their rapid hair growth. A poor-quality diet will affect mohair development.

Angora goats are generally smaller than other domestic goats and sheep. Both sexes are horned, and the ears are long and drooping. The strong elastic fiber of the coat differs from wool primarily in its smoothness and luster.

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