Home | Press Info | Join Email List | Advertise | About Us | Contact Us | Sign InLivestock Of the World
Livestock
Breeds Of
Livestock Home
Alpacas
Alpacas
Bison
Bison
Cattle
Cattle
Chickens
Chickens
Dogs
Dogs
Donkeys
Donkey
Emus
Emus
Goats
Goats
Horses
Horses
Llamas
Llamas
Pigs
Pigs
Rabbits
Rabbits
Emus
Sheep
Turkeys
Turkeys
Yaks
Yaks
Yaks For Sale
Learn About
Goats
Goats
   About Goats
Goats for Sale At:
   Livestock Of America
   Livestock Of Canada

Goats Breeds

Alpine
Altai Mountain
American Cashmere
Anatolian Black
Angora
Appenzell
Arapawa
Argentata dell'Etna
Aspromonte
Auckland Island
Australian Cashmere
Bagot
Barbari
Beetal
Belgian Fawn
Benadir
Bhuj
Bilberry
Bionda dell'Adamello
Black Bengal
Boer
Booted
Bormina
British Alpine
Brown Shorthair
Canary Island
Caninde
Capestrina
Carpathian
Caserta
Cashmere
Chamba
Chamois Colored
Changthangi
Chappar
Charnequeira
Chengde Polled
Chengdu Brown
Chigu
Ciavenasca
Cilentana Fulva
Ciociara Grigia
Corsica
Daera Din Panah
Damani
Damascus
Danish Landrace
Don
Duan
Dutch Landrace
Dutch Toggenburg
Erzgebirg
Fasana
Finnish Landrace
Frontalasca
Garganica
Girgentana
Goingeget
Golden Guernsey
Grigia Molisana
Grisons Striped
Hailun
Haimen
Hasi
Hejazi
Hexi Cashmere
Hongtong
Huaipi
Huaitoutala
Hungarian Improved
Icelandic
Irish
Istriana
Jamnapari
Jining Grey
Jonica
Kaghani
Kalahari Red
Kalbian
Kamori
Kiko
Kinder
Kri Kri
L'Aquila
LaMancha
Lariana
Loashan
Majorera
Maltese
Massif Central
Messinese
Mini Oberhasli
Miniature Silky Fainting
Montecristo
Monticellana
Mountain
Moxoto
Murcia-Granada
Murciana
Murgese di Foggia
Myotonic (Wooden Leg)
Nachi
Napoletana
Nicastrese
Nigerian Dwarf
Nigora
Norwegian
Nubian
Oberhasli
Orobica
Peacock
Pedula della Valtellina
Pezzata Rossa
Philippine
Poitou
Pomellata
Potenza
Pygmy
Pygora
Pyrenean
Qinshan
Red Boar
Red mediterranean
Repartida
Roccaverano
Rove
Russian White
Rustica
Saanen
Sable Saanen
Sahelian
Salerno
San Clemente Island
Sarda
Savanna
Screziata
Selvatica di Galite
Selvatica di Joura
Selvatica di Samotracia
Sempione
Somali
Spanish
SRD
Stiefelgeiss
Surati
Swedish Landrace
Tauernsheck
Tavolara
Tennessee Fainting
Teramo
Thuringian
Toggenburg
Uzbek Black
Valais Blackneck
Valdostana
Valfortorina
Valle dei Mocheni
Valle del Chiese
Valle di Fiemme
Vallesana
Verata
Waipu
West African Dwarf
White Shorthaired
Xinjiang
Xuhai
Yemen Mountain
Zalawadi
Zhiwulin Black
Zhongwei

About Auckland Island GoatsAbout Auckland Island Goats

Captured goat on Auckland Island 1987
Captured goat on Auckland Island 1987


Goats are reported to have been liberated in at least ten places on the Auckland Island group, New Zealand, in the second half of the nineteenth century as food for castaways, with at least one liberation in 1865 on the main Auckland Island. In 1934 the islands were gazetted as Nature Reserves and today they are administered by the Department of Conservation. By the 1970s, only one population of about a hundred goats remained, these living on the north-west side of Port Ross, one of the driest and warmest parts of the main island.

Following a 1972-1973 field study by ecologists Rudge and Campbell, they wrote (in 1977), “We conclude that numbers [of goats] will remain at much the present level or, like the rabbits on Rose Island [another of the Auckland Island group] decline with the advance of woody vegetation; and that the range will not expand beyond Grey Duck Creek. Therefore we see no merit in exterminating the population as there are many signs that the vegetation is already slowly doing it ..... Meanwhile they may be safely left alone, having the distinction of being the world’s most southerly population of feral goats.”

This was strongly contested by some leading botanists, who wrote (in 1978) that “if they are indeed dying out slowly, the opportunity should be taken of shooting them now, rather than risking an increase or spread through unforeseen circumstances. The conservation value of the native biota far transcends the limited scientific interest that the goats present.”  And a few years later, Campbell and Rudge (1984) appear to have changed their views, recommending the extermination of goats (and pigs) on the island, even though the goats had not increased in numbers – although they may have increased their range.

Subsequent observations by Rudge in 1986, made during a Department of Lands and Survey expedition to Auckland Island to capture some goats and take them to the South Island of New Zealand, indicated that the Auckland Island goats were “among the largest recorded in New Zealand.”  Eleven goats were collected at this time (one account says thirteen were captured with two dying shortly after their arrival on the mainland). A preliminary report on these by the Animal Science Group at Lincoln College noted that they ranged in colour from black to white-grey (although some pure white had been seen on the island). Blood typing showed a marked difference in terms of serum albumen and transferrins from the feral and Anglo-Nubian goats held at Lincoln. Their plasma protein characteristics were similar to Spanish Serrara Andaluza and Hungarian Saanen goats.

The Lincoln Animal Science Group report concluded: “It is clear that in spite of an inhospitable climate individual goats appear to be well adapted for survival on the Auckland Islands although the population as a whole may be limited by neo-natal mortality. Those goats which survive to maturity are large framed animals which appear to be genetically different from New Zealand feral goats. It is possible that under intensive farming conditions these goats may produce offspring of exceptional size, and good nutrition and selection could be expected to increase Cashmere [fine undercoat] production. We feel that these goats warrant further study, both as a source of new genetic material and as a physiologically adapted population that have evolved over a 100 years in a harsh climate. It would be unwise to eliminate this population completely since it is difficult to have the foresight to know what characteristics may be required of farm animals in the future ...”

In 1987 a major recovery project was undertaken by the Department of Lands & Survey, the New Zealand Navy, Jacques Cousteau and the crew of his research vessel, Calypso, and the Ministry and Agriculture and Forestry’s Fisheries Research vessel James Cook. A survey made during this expedition supported the earlier conclusion that the number of goats on the island would remain the same or steadily decline. Fifty-six animals were captured (leaving about 42 on the island), and although thirteen subsequently died, the remainder were grazed on two Landcorp properties in the South Island. All the females and half the males were run on a property at Ahaura in Westland, and the remaining males at Snowdon farm near Te Anau.

An important report in 1988 by Landcorp scientists, Aldous McIvor and Greg Sherley (who had made a field study of the goats during the 1987 expedition), summarized the history of the Auckland Island goats and the studies that had been made of them. They noted that the flock had not expanded its present range (only 0.5% of the island’s area) and consequently had not significantly damaged indigenous flora and fauna. They concluded that the remnant flock on Auckland Island was sufficiently important to warrant protection, and that the safest plan was to preserve the resource, with its own natural random mating and response to an environment free from man’s influence, on Auckland Island. They wrote: “The most practical management option that will retain the historical and scientific values of this flock is to retain the remnant flock on Auckland Island, where it can be studied and monitored. Failing this, the remaining animals should be captured and joined with the other captured animals in Westland. This however is not the the preferred option. The remnant flock should not be destroyed.”

McIvor and Sherley finished their report with a direct request to the Department of Conservation to review their recommendations to the Minister of Conservation with view to giving approval for the goats to remain on Auckland Island, where they should continue to be studied and monitored, and if necessary, confined to their present range. Alternatively, if protection was not granted, eradication should be deferred to enable Landcorp to capture the remaining animals.

However, the Minister decided to eradicate any goats remaining on Auckland Island, and this appears to have been carried out by 1992. The following year it was reported that there were only fifteen does and no bucks left of those that had been taken to the South Island of New Zealand, and a year later only six does remained and these were probably crossbreds.
Ross Fraser of the Rare Breeds Conservation Society of New Zealand made vigorous enquires about the goats in 1999, but found them to be extinct.

Content and Photo Source: New Zealand rare Breeds (www.rarebreeds.co.nz )


Goats for Sale

View Goats for Sale At

www.livestockofamerica.com/Goats/


www.livestockofCanada.com/Goats/
Livestock Of The World